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February2014BookCoverWelcome to Buckaroo Country

Photos of Great Basin Buckaroos in eastern Oregon, northern Nevada and northern California and New! Montana!
by Mary Williams Hyde

Click here to see many of the photo archives!
and
here to see ones from mostly 2012 that have special effects applied
Help keep me on the road!!!

I have been traveling for over 20 years with this basic mission: take photos of everyone who keeps the old Great Basin Buckaroo/Vaquero/Californios traditions. I have about one more year of traveling to complete that goal. If you enjoy the photos I take, please support me by making a trip sponsorship.


I love doing this work and sharing it with you brings me endless joy.

What is the difference between a cowboy and a buckaroo

Answer (Source as good as any I could find: http://wiki.answers.com)

Great differences exist between the two cultures and styles of stockmanship. To say both are the same, would be akin to saying Mexicans and Spaniards are the same. Vaquero/Buckaroo horsemanship is a light-handed, more humane method of work than that of the traditional cowboy. A cowboy will use his horse to work cattle, whereas a vaquero/buckaroo will use the cattle to work his horse. Often, the mode of dress between the two can be one form of identification between the two. The equipment used in doing the same work is another way to differentiate.

Buckaroos tend to prefer a shorter form of legging, called chinks. There is also a more natural and less flashy type of legging used, called Armitas. Cowboys tend to prefer the more gaudy batwing chaps or some for of shotgun chaps. Cowboys can be distinguished by the synonymous hat that we see throughout the modern western culture and throughout Hollywood! Buckaroos tend to prefer a more flat-crowned and flat-brimmed hat. Buckaroos often like the use of a rawhide reata, instead of the nylon and/or poly rope. The longer, the better for buckaroos. Buckaroos also prefer a more flashy and larger style of spurs than do their cowboy counterparts, as with their bits too. Buckaroos prefer a more ornately decorated spade bit, which takes a long process and years of horse training to get to, whereas cowboys will utilize a more simplistic curb bit or something similar!

Saddles have many differences between the two cultures as well! Cowboys utilize a more generic, western-style saddle from which they can rope from. Buckaroos employ what is referred to as a Slick Fork Saddle, one with a larger Mexican or Californio style horn, which lends itself to better dallying and more ease of use.

These and many more differences exist between the cultures. It is unfair to both to say they are the same. To voice such an opinion would belittle all that each culture has worked for and worked toward in order to preserve their own history.

For more information on the subject of Buckaroo and Buckaroo lifestyle, these Google searches are recommended: Great Basin Buckaroo; The Californios; Buckaroo Horsemanship; Buckaroo Lifestyle; and Ranch Roping.

 

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